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Buddy Check 3

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Buddy Check 3 October

Updated: Saturday, August 3 2013, 01:50 PM CDT
PENSACOLA - The Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk  is a huge event in Pensacola.
Last year, more than 10-thousand people took part.
Because of such huge participation, the American Cancer Society has designated Pensacola's walk as a research study site.
In today's Buddy Check Three, Kathryn Daniel shows us how you can take part in the landmark study....

Mardi McDaniel is no stranger to cancer.
"My parents both have had cancer, my father died from it.  My aunt has stomach cancer, two of my best friends died from cancer."
    
She's heading up the Cancer Prevention Study Three collection site in Pensacola.
During the upcoming Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk, medical professionals will be enrolling folks.
It takes just 15 minutes.
    
To take part, you have to be between 30 and 65 years old, never have had cancer, agree to answer an annual emailed questionnaire, And give a small blood sample.
"That blood will be kept in a depository, it will not be touched until that day or time you may be diagnosed with cancer."

If you're diagnosed, your blood sample will be studied, along with your yearly surveys.
Scientists study the data to identify where and what kind of cancers are developing, and what lifestyle factors or environmental exposures may factor in.
This is the 3rd cancer prevention study the American Cancer Society has conducted.
The first two proved smoking and second hand smoke cause cancer.

"They thought it probably did, but the proof was in the pudding with Cancer Prevention Two.  One of the other things was that aspirin helped prevent colorectal cancer."
    
McDaniel says these decades spanning studies have changed the direction of cancer research, treatment and prevention.
"This is where your money goes, and you need to be a part of it."
    
Lori Perkins heads up our local making strides walk.
She often hears from friends and family members of patients  who want to "do something."

"This is your part to be a part of research, and say that you helped out in a different way.  That is unlike giving money or walking or volunteering."
    
McDaniel says the findings of this study will shape the lifestyles of her descendants, just like the conclusions of studies one and two changed hers, exactly why she's taken on the challenge.
"I don't ever want, I have two precious grandchildren and I don't want them to ever hear, "You have cancer."
    
Kathryn Daniel, Channel Three News.

Buddy Check 3 October


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